To the Village!

This was my first walk to the village of Inverie from home, about 7 miles, with my walking trailer. Surely not too difficult an aspiration I thought to myself. The first 6.9 miles are ALL uphill. It felt like that, but in reality it was the first mile. That was bad enough and I huffed and puffed like Thomas the Tank badly in need of a service. In-between I tried lift my spirits by singing “Where have all the Flowers Gone” but substituting “downhills” for flowers. It was a breathy, gasping at times, rendition with no discernible tune, but it did the trick.
If you’re under 50 you won’t know the song, but the group – Peter, Paul and Mary – were the equivalent of a band of today being made up of Ed Sheehan, Sam Smith and Lady Gaga.
Sure enough after the first mile ascent followed by 3 miles playing uppy downy I found a lovely series of downhill sections. I reached the village, spouted a load of tosh about “Oh, it was quite easy really” and “Yes, I could walk back, but someones ask me drop their vehicle off” before dropping down into a chair in the tearoom and devouring every vegan item on the menu!
Secretly I was pleased with myself and in my mind I was thinking ‘857 more of those walks and I’ll have finished’ which suddenly seemed rather a lot. There was only one thing for it, in my still wheezy voice I asked “Can I have another soya latte please?”

Windy Walk

Sometimes you have to push yourself to achieve a goal. Yesterday it was a seven mile walk through the remnants of Storm Erik to get to Knoydart Pottery and Tearoom where an evening of whist awaited. For £3 you get an evening of laughs, some (sometimes far too) serious card playing, half time nibbles and a good catch up with Knoydart locals. I lost at cards – very badly, but no-one ever really loses on nights like that. 
The walk was stunning as always. In the short clip the main island over the sea is Skye, with the Isle of Rum at it’s tip and then Eigg bathed in sunshine. Then it’s the Atlantic Ocean as far as you can see.
With a shameful plug I have to tell you Knoydart is a great place for a hoilday, especially if you crave tranquility, peace and quiet and you want to step off this hectic world of ours for a week or two. Have alook at https://www.visitknoydart.co.uk
The walking trailer has been slightly modified – more later (I know you can’t wait to see it, but calm yourselves :-)) I’ve been working out bits of kit that is or isn’t going to be needed and I’ll be out this coming week dragging it up some very steep roads! Ah well its got to be done.

A chilly one

I decided to venture out for an 8 mile training walk in the cold weather. I didn’t have my thermals on, but I’d tucked my shirt into my pants and kept my hands inside my sleeves. Great advice from my Boys book of knowledge as I was toasty!
This is where I live, the Knoydart peninsula, a remote community in the Highlands of Scotland which is reached by boat or a 16 mile hike over mountains and bog. I prefer the ferry.
We only have one road which is 7 miles long. It’s an undulating and at times unforgiving road, but with a chance of seeing deer, golden eagles, dolphins off shore and many other wild creatures its worth venturing out. The road just goes along the coast and back – thats it. No link to the outside world.
The population of around 110 are very generous of spirit and have really got behind The Listening Walk. If you are visiting Knoydart while I’m away pop into the Knoydart Pottery and Tearoom where you’ll find a huge wall map showing where I am. They even donated money from a recent bingo and quiz night towards the maps purchase. I was the bingo caller and after a couple of muted attempts at two little ducks 22, the excited bingo-ers wouldn’t stop bloomin quacking on the final game.